There’s an obvious appeal that comes to mind when you first think about telecommuting. Many global companies — including Aperian Global — allow employees to telecommute. The benefits of a remote workforce stem from allowing employees to spend more time in their comfort zones, but does it always lead to increased productivity? Most recent studies point to “yes,” but there are many considerations to make when deciding if telecommuting is right for you or your company.
Employee engagement and motivation. Consider giving remote and office workers surveys to see who is more engaged and motivated overall. Ask questions about how they feel coming to work every day, find out whether they’re inspired at work and ask if they think their role within the company is important. Ask specific questions about whether or not they feel included in group decisions and ask if they feel as though their needs and concerns are considered and addressed.

Even if a company gets only the same levels of productivity, efficiency and morale, the company still benefits from the virtual worker. When employees are responsible for their own housing, costs for the enterprise immediately go down, according to Forbes. This is true even of the biggest companies in the world. Aetna stopped paying for 2.7 million square feet of floor space ($78 million) when it created 14,500 virtual jobs for 35,000 employees. American Express reported savings of $10 million when it began its virtual work programs.


In a 2008 interview with American Society of Association Executives, Deb Keary, human resources director for the Society for Human Resource Management, cited two potential problems with telecommuting. One is if a telecommuter isn't suited to working outside the office, and the work suffers. The other is if the manager isn't suited to it or isn't comfortable with it. In that case, it won't work. "Not all managers are cut out to supervise telecommuters," she said. In addition, there are some occupations that obviously are unsuitable for telework arrangements, such as laborers and clinicians; however, positions that require minimal personal interaction may be very well suited to telecommuting from virtual offices.
Virtual offices allow a greater number of employees to work at any given time. With a typical office space or location, you are limited by the size of your space. With a virtual office, space is not a limiting factor. Business owners can have however many staff they need. When used in combination with a physical space, a virtual office can free up more space in the physical office.

A virtual assistant is either self-employed or an employee working offsite in a home office. Virtual assistants are considered independent contractors instead of employees for a company. Due to this status, the client does not take any taxes out of the pay compensated to the VA. Such assistants are responsible for paying in their own quarterly tax payments, as well as obtaining their own independent contractor’s insurance and medical benefits. Virtual Assistants can work independently or as an employee of a multi-VA firm. VA clients can include small businesses, corporate offices, medical practices and entrepreneurs. According to statistics, it is estimated that there are approximately 25,000 virtual assistants worldwide and that number is growing daily. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Employee engagement and motivation. Consider giving remote and office workers surveys to see who is more engaged and motivated overall. Ask questions about how they feel coming to work every day, find out whether they’re inspired at work and ask if they think their role within the company is important. Ask specific questions about whether or not they feel included in group decisions and ask if they feel as though their needs and concerns are considered and addressed.
Ruth Mayhew has been writing since the mid-1980s, and she has been an HR subject matter expert since 1995. Her work appears in "The Multi-Generational Workforce in the Health Care Industry," and she has been cited in numerous publications, including journals and textbooks that focus on human resources management practices. She holds a Master of Arts in sociology from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Ruth resides in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C.

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