The virtual worker is a mainstream worker. 23% of workers are completing at least some of their work from a remote space, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This statistic is corroborated by the New York Times, which reports an even faster rise in telecommuting. Outside of America, fully 79% of knowledge workers are virtual workers. 60% of virtual workers stated that they would leave their current job for one with more freedom to work remotely. There is a rising number of upwardly mobile professionals who are leveraging the Internet to work remotely full time as employees or as contractors.
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Employees from the younger generations of workers--Generation X and Generation Y, in particular--find virtual work a tremendous benefit. Virtual offices and telecommuting offer flexibility, and the comfort of being able to work independently without conforming to work rules, such as a dress code and traditional work hours. Telecommuting is appealing to some workers because it prevents the often unnecessary and unwelcome interruptions by co-workers and managers that can impede productivity and attentiveness.

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